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2020. november 20.

Threat Roundup for November 13 to November 20

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between November 13 and November 20. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201120-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

2020. november 18.

Back from vacation: Analyzing Emotet’s activity in 2020

By Nick Biasini, Edmund Brumaghin, and Jaeson Schultz.

Emotet is one of the most heavily distributed malware families today. Cisco Talos observes large quantities of Emotet emails being sent to individuals and organizations around the world on an almost daily basis. These emails are typically sent automatically by previously infected systems   attempting to infect new systems with Emotet to continue growing the size of the botnets associated with this threat. Emotet is often the initial malware that is delivered as part of a multi-stage infection process and is not targeted in nature. Emotet has impacted systems in virtually every country on the planet over the past several years and often leads to high impact security incidents as the network access it provides to adversaries enables further attacks, such as big-game hunting and double-extortion ransomware attacks.

Cisco Talos obtained ownership of several domains that Emotet uses to send SMTP communications. We leveraged these domains to sinkhole email communications originating from the Emotet botnets for the purposes of observing the characteristics of these email campaigns over time and to gain additional insight into the scope and profile of Emotet infections and the organizations being impacted by this threat. Emotet has been observed taking extended breaks over the past few years, and 2020 was no exception. Let’s take a look at what Emotet has been up to in 2020 and the effect it’s had on the internet as a whole.

Read More >>

2020. november 17.

Nibiru ransomware variant decryptor

Nikhil Hegde developed this tool.

Weak encryption

The Nibiru ransomware is a .NET-based malware family. It traverses directories in the local disks, encrypts files with Rijndael-256 and gives them a .Nibiru extension. Rijndael-256 is a secure encryption algorithm. However, Nibiru uses a hard-coded string “Nibiru” to compute the 32-byte key and 16-byte IV values. The decryptor program leverages this weakness to decrypt files encrypted by this variant.

Read more

2020. november 13.

Threat Roundup for November 6 to November 13

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between November 6 and November 13. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201113-tru.json  – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

2020. november 12.

CRAT wants to plunder your endpoints

By Asheer Malhotra.

  • Cisco Talos has observed a new version of a remote access trojan (RAT) family known as CRAT.
  • Apart from the prebuilt RAT capabilities, the malware can download and deploy additional malicious plugins on the infected endpoint.
  • One of the plugins is a ransomware known as “Hansom.”
  • CRAT has been attributed to the Lazarus APT Group in the past.
  • The RAT consists of multiple obfuscation techniques to hide strings, API names, command and control (C2) URLs and instrumental functions, along with static detection evasion.
  • The attack also employs a multitude of anti-infection checks to evade sandbox based detection systems.
What’s new?

Cisco Talos has recently discovered a new version of the CRAT malware family. This version consists of multiple RAT capabilities, additional plugins and a variety of detection-evasion techniques. In the past, CRAT has been attributed to the Lazarus Group, the malicious threat actors behind multiple cyber campaigns, including attacks against the entertainment sector.

Indicators and tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) discovered by this investigation resemble those of the Lazarus Group.

Read More >>

2020. november 6.

Threat Roundup for October 30 to November 6

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between October 30 and November 6. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201106-tru.json  – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

2020. október 30.

Threat Roundup for October 23 to October 30

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between October 23 and October 30. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201030-tru.json  – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

2020. október 30.

Cisco Talos Advisory on Adversaries Targeting the Healthcare and Public Health Sector

Background Cisco Talos has become aware that an adversary is leveraging Trickbot banking trojan and Ryuk ransomware to target U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers at an increasing rate. Security journalists reported on October 28, 2020 that the adversary was preparing to encrypt systems at “potentially hundreds” of medical centers and hospitals, based on a tip from a researcher who had been monitoring communications for the threat actor. On October 28 and 29, these claims were supported by the reports of six U.S. hospitals being compromised with Ryuk in the span of 24 hours. CISA, the FBI, and HHS also confirmed this activity targeting the Healthcare and Public Health Sector, releasing a joint advisory on October 28, 2020. The advisory stated that the Ryuk actors were using Trickbot to target the industry and that the activity posed an “increased and imminent” threat. They also published technical indicators for both Trickbot and Ryuk. Talos has years of experience dealing with Trickbot, Ryuk, and other tools used by the adversary. We are currently supporting customers who are affected and working hand-in-hand with federal law enforcement to support their investigations.  We are also supporting other law enforcement and federal agencies as well. If you have a customer that has been impacted by an attack, ransomware or otherwise, the first course of action is to engage Cisco Talos Incident Response Services (CTIR). For emergencies, call 1-844-831-7715 to reach the Technical Assistance Center (TAC), who will then put you in touch with members of CTIR who are on call. Account managers can also email IRSalesSupport@cisco.com and visit http://go2.cisco.com/CTIRSales. Read More >>
2020. október 29.

DoNot’s Firestarter abuses Google Firebase Cloud Messaging to spread

  • The newly discovered Firestarter malware uses Google Firebase Cloud Messaging to notify its authors of the final payload location.
  • Even if the command and control (C2) is taken down, the DoNot team can still redirect the malware to another C2 using Google infrastructure.
  • The approach in the final payload upload denotes a highly personalized targeting policy.

What’s new? The DoNot APT group is making strides to experiment with new methods of delivery for their payloads. They are using a legitimate service within Google’s infrastructure which makes it harder for detection across a users network.

How did it work? Users are lured to install a malicious app on their mobile device. This malicious app then contains additional malicious code which attempts to download a payload based on information obtained from the compromised device. This ensures only very specific devices are delivered the malicious payload.

So what? Innovation across APT Groups is not unheard of and this shouldn’t come as a huge surprise that a group continues to modify their operations to ensure they are as stealth as can be. This should be another warning sign to folks in geo-politically “hot” regions that it is entirely possible that you can become a victim of a highly motivated group.

Read more >>>

The post DoNot’s Firestarter abuses Google Firebase Cloud Messaging to spread appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. október 24.

Threat Roundup for October 16 to October 23

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between October 16 and October 23. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201023-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for October 16 to October 23 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. október 20.

Dynamic Data Resolver – Version 1.0.1 beta

Cisco Talos is releasing a new beta version of Dynamic Data Resolver (DDR) today. This release comes with a new architecture for samples using multi-threading. The process and thread tracing has been completely reimplemented.

We also fixed a few bugs and memory leaks. Another new feature is that the DDR backend now comes in two flavors: a release version and a debugging version. The latter will improve code quality and bug hunting. It helps to detect memory leaks and minor issues which are silently handled by the underlying DynamoRIO framework in the release version. We also improved the installer and the IDA plugin is now installed to the user plugin directory instead to the IDA installation directory under Program Files. The IDA plugin and all its dependencies are also now automatically installed by a script.

Fantastic news! DDR has won the HexRays IDA plugin contest 2020

READ MORE>>

The post Dynamic Data Resolver – Version 1.0.1 beta appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. október 16.

Threat Roundup for October 9 to October 16

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between October 9 and October 16. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201016-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for October 9 to October 16 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. október 13.

Lemon Duck brings cryptocurrency miners back into the spotlight

Attackers are constantly reinventing ways of monetizing their tools. Cisco Talos recently discovered a complex campaign employing a multi-modular botnet with multiple ways to spread. This threat, known as “Lemon Duck,” has a cryptocurrency mining payload that steals computer resources to mine the Monero virtual currency. The actor employs various methods to spread across the network, like sending infected RTF files using email, psexec, WMI and SMB exploits, including the infamous Eternal Blue and SMBGhost threats that affect Windows 10 machines. Some variants also support RDP brute-forcing. In recent attacks we observed, this functionality was omitted. The adversary also uses tools such as Mimikatz, that help the botnet increase the amount of systems participating in its mining pool.

Read More >>

The post Lemon Duck brings cryptocurrency miners back into the spotlight appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. október 9.

Threat Roundup for October 2 to October 9

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between September 25 and October 2. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201009-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for October 2 to October 9 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. október 6.

90 days, 16 bugs, and an Azure Sphere Challenge

Cisco Talos reports 16 vulnerabilities in Microsoft Azure Sphere’s sponsored research challenge.

By Claudio Bozzato and Lilith [-_-]; and Dave McDaniel.

 

On May 15, 2020, Microsoft kicked off the Azure Sphere Security Research Challenge, a three-month initiative aimed at finding bugs in Azure Sphere. Among the teams and individuals selected, Cisco Talos conducted a three-month sprint of research into the platform and reported 16 vulnerabilities of various severity, including a privilege escalation bug chain to acquire Azure Sphere Capabilities, the most valuable Linux normal-world permissions in the Azure Sphere context.

 

The Azure Sphere platform is a cloud-connected and custom SoC platform designed specifically for IoT application security. Internally, the SoC is made up of a set of several ARM cores that have different roles (e.g. running different types of applications, enforcing security, and managing encryption). Externally, the Azure Sphere platform is supported by Microsoft’s Azure Cloud, which handles secure updates, app deployment, and periodic verification of device integrity to determine if Azure Cloud access should be allowed or not. Note however, that while the Azure Sphere is updated and deploys through the Azure Cloud, customers can still interact with their own servers independently. Read More

The post 90 days, 16 bugs, and an Azure Sphere Challenge appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. október 6.

PoetRAT: Malware targeting public and private sector in Azerbaijan evolves

Cisco Talos discovered PoetRAT earlier this year. We have continued to monitor this actor and their behavior over the preceding months. We have observed multiple new campaigns indicating a change in the actor’s capabilities and showing their maturity toward better operational security. We assess with medium confidence this actor continues to use spear-phishing attacks to lure a user to download a malicious document from temporary hosting providers. We currently believe the malware comes from malicious URLs included in the email, resulting in the user clicking and downloading a malicious document. These Word documents continue to contain malicious macros, which in turn download additional payloads once the attacker sets their sites on a particular victim. Previous versions of PoetRAT deployed a Python interpreter to execute the included source code which resulted in a much larger file size compared to the latest version’s switch to Lua script. As the geopolitical tensions grow in Azerbaijan with neighbouring countries, this is no doubt a stage of espionage with national security implications being deployed by a malicious actor with a specific interest in various Azerbajiani government departments.

Read more >>>

The post PoetRAT: Malware targeting public and private sector in Azerbaijan evolves appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. október 3.

Threat Roundup for September 25 to October 2

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between September 25 and October 2. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201002-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for September 25 to October 2 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. szeptember 29.

LodaRAT Update: Alive and Well

Talos recently identified new versions of Loda RAT, a remote access trojan written in AutoIt. Not only have these versions abandoned their usual obfuscation techniques, several functions have been rewritten and new functionality has been added. In one version, a hex-encoded PowerShell keylogger script has been added, along with a new VB script, only to be removed in a later version. Direct interaction from the threat actor was observed during analysis. Since our blog post on Loda in February 2020, Talos has been continually monitoring Loda RAT for new behavior. Recently there have been several changes that indicate that the authors are learning new techniques to improve the effectiveness of Loda. While these changes are somewhat minor, it shows that the authors are continually developing Loda into a more robust RAT.

Read More >>

The post LodaRAT Update: Alive and Well appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. szeptember 29.

Microsoft Netlogon exploitation continues to rise

Cisco Talos is tracking a spike in exploitation attempts against the Microsoft vulnerability CVE-2020-1472, an elevation of privilege bug in Netlogon, outlined in the August Microsoft Patch Tuesday report. The vulnerability stems from a flaw in a cryptographic authentication scheme used by the Netlogon Remote Protocol which — among other things — can be used to update computer passwords by forging an authentication token for specific Netlogon functionality. This flaw allows attackers to impersonate any computer, including the domain controller itself and gain access to domain admin credentials.

Read more

The post Microsoft Netlogon exploitation continues to rise appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. szeptember 25.

Threat Roundup for September 18 to September 25

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between September 18 and September 25. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20200925-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for September 18 to September 25 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.