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2020. április 3.

Threat Roundup for March 27 to April 3

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Mar 27 and Apr 3. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

20200403-tru.json – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for March 27 to April 3 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. április 2.

AZORult brings friends to the party

By Vanja Svajcer.

Attackers are constantly reinventing ways of monetizing their tools. Cisco Talos recently discovered a complex campaign with several different executable payloads, all focused on providing financial benefits for the attacker in a slightly different way. The first payload is a Monero cryptocurrency miner based on XMRigCC, and the second is a trojan that monitors the clipboard and replaces its content. There’s also a variant of the infamous AZORult information-stealing malware, a variant of Remcos remote access tool and, finally, the DarkVNC backdoor trojan.

Defenders need to be constantly vigilant and monitor the behavior of systems within their network. Attackers are like water — they will attempt to find the smallest crack to achieve their goals. While organizations need to be focused on protecting their most valuable assets, they should not ignore threats that are not particularly targeted toward their infrastructure.

Read More >>

The post AZORult brings friends to the party appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 31.

Trickbot: A primer

In recent years, the modular banking trojan known as Trickbot has evolved to become one of the most advanced trojans in the threat landscape. It has gone through a diverse set of changes since it was first discovered in 2016, including adding features that focus on Windows 10 and modules that target point of sale (POS) systems. Not only does it function as a standalone trojan, Trickbot is also commonly used as a dropper for other malware such as the Ryuk ransomware. The wide range of functionality allows this malware to adapt to different environments and maximize effectiveness in a compromised network.

Read More >>

The post Trickbot: A primer appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 30.

COVID-19 relief package provides another platform for bad actors

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continues to yield new subject matter that bad actors can turn into fodder for enticing victims into clicking on malicious links and attachments. On March 27, the CARES Act was signed into law by the President, enacting a wide range of stimulus packages designed to aid Americans and businesses during the crisis. One such measure will authorize a supplemental stimulus check to American citizens.

Along with the general increase in coronavirus and COVID-19-themed attacks, this stimulus package will also be leveraged as a lure to deliver additional attacks to harm the unsuspecting victim into divulging personal information or be subject to financially based exploitation.

Talos has already detected an increase in suspicious stimulus-based domains being registered and we anticipate they will be leveraged to launch malicious campaigns against users.

Read more

The post COVID-19 relief package provides another platform for bad actors appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 28.

Threat Roundup for March 20 to March 27

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Mar 20 and Mar 27. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

20200327-tru.json – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for March 20 to March 27 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 26.

Threat Update: COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic is changing everyday life for workers across the globe. Cisco Talos continues to see attackers take advantage of the coronavirus situation to lure unsuspecting users into various pitfalls such as phishing, fraud, and disinformation campaigns. Talos has not yet observed any new techniques during this event. Rather, we have seen malicious actors shift the subject matter of their attacks to focus on COVID themes. We continue to monitor the situation and are sharing intel with the security community, customers, law enforcement, and governments.

Protecting your organization from threats that leverage COVID themes relies on the same strong security infrastructure foundation that your organization hopefully already has. However, security organizations must ensure existing protections and capabilities function in a newly remote environment, that users are aware of the threats and how to identify them and that organizations have implemented security best practices for remote work.

Read More >>

The post Threat Update: COVID-19 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 20.

Threat Roundup for March 13 to March 20

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Mar 13 and Mar 20. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

20200320-tru.json  – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for March 13 to March 20 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 20.

Threat Roundup for March 13 to March 20

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Mar 13 and Mar 20. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

20200320-tru.json – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for March 13 to March 20 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 13.

Threat Roundup for March 6 to March 13

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Mar 6 and Mar 13. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

20200313-tru.json  – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for March 6 to March 13 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 6.

Threat Roundup for February 28 to March 6

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Feb 28 and Mar 6. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

20200306-tru.json  – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for February 28 to March 6 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. március 5.

Bisonal: 10 years of play

Bisonal is a remote access trojan (RAT) that’s part of the Tonto Team arsenal. The peculiarity of the RAT is that it’s been in use for more than 10 years — this is an uncommon and long period for malware. Over the years, it has evolved and adapted mechanisms to avoid detection while keeping the core of its RAT the same. We identified specific functions here for more than six years.

This is an extremely experienced group likely to keep their activities even after exposure, even if we identified mistakes and bad copy/paste, they are doing this job for more than 10 years. We think that exposing this malware, explaining the behavior and the campaigns where Bisonal was used is important to protect the potential future targets. The targets to this point are located in the public and private sectors with a focus on Russia, Japan and South Korea. We recommend the entities located in this area to prepare for this malware and actor and implement detections based on the technical details provided in this article.

More >>

The post Bisonal: 10 years of play appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. február 28.

Threat Roundup for February 21 to February 28

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Feb 21 and Feb 28. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

TRU02282020  – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for February 21 to February 28 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. február 25.

New Research Paper: Prevalence and Impact of Low-Entropy Packing Schemes in the Malware Ecosystem

Detection of malware is a constant battle between the technologies designed to detect and prevent malware and the authors creating them. One common technique adversaries leverage is packing binaries. Packing an executable is similar to applying compression or encryption and can inhibit the ability of some technologies to detect the packed malware. High entropy is traditionally a tell-tale sign of the presence of a packer, but many malware analysts may have probably encountered low-entropy packers more than once. Numerous popular tools (e.g., PEiD, ManalyzeDetect It Easy), malware-related courses, and even reference books on the topic, affirm that packed malware often shows a high entropy. As a consequence, many researchers use this heuristic in their analysis routines. It is also well known that the tools typically used to detect packers are based on signature matching and may sometimes combine other heuristics, but again, the results are not completely faithful, as many of the signatures that circulate are prone to false positives

Read More >>

The post New Research Paper: Prevalence and Impact of Low-Entropy Packing Schemes in the Malware Ecosystem appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. február 21.

Threat Roundup for February 14 to February 21

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Feb 14 and Feb 21. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

TRU02212020  – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for February 14 to February 21 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. február 20.

ObliqueRAT: New RAT hits victims’ endpoints via malicious documents

By Asheer Malhotra.

  • Cisco Talos has observed a malware campaign that utilizes malicious Microsoft Office documents (maldocs) to spread a remote access trojan (RAT) we’re calling “ObliqueRAT.”
  • These maldocs use malicious macros to deliver the second stage RAT payload.
  • This campaign appears to target organizations in Southeast Asia.
  • Network based detection, although important, should be combined with endpoint protections to combat this threat and provide multiple layers of security.

 

What’s New?

Cisco Talos has recently discovered a new campaign distributing a malicious remote access trojan (RAT) family we’re calling “ObliqueRAT.” Cisco Talos also discovered a link between ObliqueRAT and another campaign from December 2019 distributing CrimsonRAT sharing similar maldocs and macros. CrimsonRAT has been known to target diplomatic and government organizations in Southeast Asia.

Read More>>

The post ObliqueRAT: New RAT hits victims’ endpoints via malicious documents appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. február 18.

Building a bypass with MSBuild

By Vanja Svajcer.

In one of our previous posts, we discussed the usage of default operating system functionality and other legitimate executables to execute the so-called “living-off-the-land” approach to the post-compromise phase of an attack. We called those binaries LoLBins. Since then, Cisco Talos has analyzed telemetry we received from Cisco products and attempted to measure the usage of LoLBins in real-world attacks.

Specifically, we are going to focus on MSBuild as a platform for post-exploitation activities. For that, we are collecting information from open and closed data repositories as well as the behavior of samples submitted for analysis to the Cisco Threat Grid platform.

What’s new?

We collected malicious MSBuild project configuration files and documented their structure, observed infection vectors and final payloads. We also discuss potential actors behind the discovered threats.

Read More >>

The post Building a bypass with MSBuild appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. február 14.

Threat Roundup for February 7 to February 14

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between Feb 7 and Feb 14. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference:

TRU02142020  – This is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for February 7 to February 14 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

2020. február 13.

Threat actors attempt to capitalize on coronavirus outbreak

By Nick Biasini and Edmund Brumaghin.

  • Coronavirus is dominating the news and threat actors are taking advantage.
  • Cisco Talos has found multiple malware families being distributed with Coronavirus lures and themes. This includes emotet and several RAT variants.
Executive Summary

Using the news to try and increase clicks and drive traffic is nothing new for malicious actors. We commonly see actors leveraging current news stories or events to try and increase the likelihood of infection. The biggest news currently is focused on the new virus affecting the world, with a focus on China: the coronavirus. There are countless news articles and email-based marketing campaigns going at full throttle right now, as such, we wanted to take a deeper look at how this is manifesting itself on the threat landscape.

Our investigation had several phases, first looking at the email based campaigns then pivoting into open-source intelligence sources for additional samples. These investigations uncovered a series of campaigns from the adversaries behind Emotet, along with a series of other commodity malware families using these same topics as lures, and a couple of odd documents and applications along the way. What was also striking was the amount of legitimate emails containing things like Microsoft Word documents and Excel spreadsheets related to the coronavirus. This really underscores why using these as lures is so attractive to adversaries and why organizations and individuals need to be vigilant when opening mail attachments, regardless of its origins.

Read More >>

The post Threat actors attempt to capitalize on coronavirus outbreak appeared first on Cisco Blogs.